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DEBATES About AMERICAN IMPERIALISM [APUSH Unit 7 Topic 2] Period 7: 1898-1945

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💫 Short Summary

The video explores American imperialism from 1898 to 1945, detailing the expansion of the US's political, economic, and military influence. It discusses the purchase of Alaska, the debate between imperialists and anti-imperialists, and the motivations behind imperialism, including economic interests and the desire for new markets. The anti-imperialist perspective is also examined, focusing on the principles of self-determination for nations and the potential negative consequences of foreign entanglement.

✨ Highlights
📊 Transcript
The video introduces Unit 7 of the AP US History curriculum, focusing on American imperialism from 1898 to 1945.
00:00
Imperialism is the expansion of one country's political, economic, and military influence over another country.
The purchase of Alaska in 1867 marked America's entry into imperialist expansion.
There was a fierce debate between imperialists and anti-imperialists regarding the proper role of the US in the world.
Imperialists sought to justify expansion by securing new markets, raw materials, and promoting the idea of American cultural and racial superiority.
The anti-imperialists argued for the principle of self-determination for nations and warned against the negative consequences of foreign entanglement.
Imperialists believed in the expansion of empires to secure new markets and raw materials, using the justification of social Darwinism and the need to compete with other global powers.
02:40
Imperialists wanted to promote American goods and believed in the superiority of the American way of life.
The idea of expanding American empire was also driven by the need to secure new markets for industrial and agricultural products.
Social Darwinism was used to argue that the strong nations have the right to expand and dominate others.
The desire to prevent America from being seen as a second-class nation also motivated imperialist expansion.
The main arguments for the anti-imperialist camp focused on the principle of self-determination for nations and the potential negative consequences of foreign entanglement.
04:02
Anti-imperialists believed that by taking over less powerful countries, America would deny them the right to self-determination.
They cited George Washington's warning against foreign entanglement in their arguments.
There was a debate about whether the Constitution should apply to the people of territories where the American flag was planted.
Some anti-imperialists argued that this debate was a disguise for the real concern about the rights of people in the conquered territories.
💫 FAQs about This YouTube Video

1. What is imperialism in the context of American history?

Imperialism in American history refers to the expansion of the United States' political, economic, and military influence over other countries. It describes the nation's pursuit of overseas territories and influence, particularly during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

2. What were the main drivers of American imperialism during the late 19th and early 20th centuries?

The main drivers of American imperialism during this period were economic interests, the desire for territorial expansion, belief in the cultural and racial superiority of the United States, and the aspiration to compete with other global powers.

3. How did the acquisition of Alaska and the discovery of gold contribute to a shift in the perception of imperialist expansion?

The purchase of Alaska and the discovery of gold in the territory contributed to a shift in the perception of imperialist expansion by demonstrating the potential economic value of acquiring new territories. This event increased the desire for further overseas expansion and shaped attitudes towards imperialist policies.

4. What were the key arguments and attitudes of the imperialists and anti-imperialists during the debate on American imperial expansion?

The imperialists supported American imperial expansion, citing the benefits of economic growth, the spread of American values, and the idea of manifest destiny. On the other hand, the anti-imperialists opposed expansion, emphasizing the importance of self-determination for other nations and expressing concerns about the potential negative consequences of imperialist policies.

5. How did the concept of American imperialism during this period impact international relations and the global perception of the United States?

The concept of American imperialism during this period significantly impacted international relations and the global perception of the United States. It led to the acquisition of overseas territories and involvement in international conflicts, shaping the U.S.'s role as a major world power and influencing its interactions with other nations.