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What does larger scale software development look like?

Web Dev Cody2023-07-10
web development#programming#coding#code#learn to code#tutorial#software engineering
1M views|1 years ago
💫 Short Summary

Enterprise software development involves a team of developers, a scrum master, a project manager, and possibly designers, working to fulfill client requests and build and deploy software features. The team uses version control, such as Git, and follows a process of feature branching, pull requests, code review, and continuous integration/continuous deployment (CI/CD) to deliver shippable features to users. The video explains the software development workflow using different branches and environments, such as Dev and Staging, for testing and deploying code changes. It emphasizes the use of infrastructure as code tools like Terraform and automated deployment pipelines to ensure consistency and reliability across environments. The video discusses the complexities of deploying code in enterprise settings, where multiple teams are involved in working on different projects with their own unique deployment processes. It also touches on handling bugs and ensuring high uptime and resilience in the production environment, including considerations such as multi-region deployments and data replication. In this video, the speaker discusses the complexity of back merging changes from the main branch to the development environment in enterprise software development. They highlight the need for such processes in high-stakes systems to avoid breaking production and the potential impacts on users' lives. The speaker also emphasizes the difference in approach between smaller teams or startups and large-scale enterprise systems.

✨ Highlights
📊 Transcript
Introduction to Enterprise Software Development
00:00
The video provides insight into how a system and a team of 10 developers collaborate to code, integrate, build, test, and deploy their applications.
The team consists of developers, a scrum master, a project manager, and one or two UX designers.
The client serves as the buffer between the users and the development team, providing requests and feedback.
The goal is to satisfy the client's vision and requirements while also considering the needs of the users.
Project Management and Software Development Life Cycle
03:26
Developers aim to ship features that satisfy the clients and users.
The process involves continuous feedback loops, polishing existing features, and building new ones.
Requirements from clients and users are translated into deployable packages.
Version Control and Collaboration
04:15
Developers use git for version control, with the main branch containing production code.
Feature branches are created for developers to work on specific tasks.
Pull requests are made to merge developed features into the main branch, with emphasis on knowledge sharing and peer review.
CI/CD Pipeline for Building and Deploying Code
06:06
Merging code into the main branch triggers the CI/CD pipeline.
The CI/CD pipeline involves building, testing, and deploying the code using tools like GitHub actions.
The end result is a shippable feature that is ready for use by the clients and users.
Different branches are used for development and testing in enterprise software.
00:07
In Enterprise software, merging features directly into the main branch is not feasible without a robust testing suite.
Teams often use QA Engineers to verify the code and have a separate branch for testing, such as a test branch and a dev branch.
The dev branch is for developers to integrate their features, and code should be pushed to this branch daily.
00:09
Developers work off the dev branch to integrate their features.
The purpose is to have a centralized location for integrating changes.
Code should be pushed to the dev branch daily to facilitate integration.
Merging code to the Dev branch triggers a build, deploy, and test process, creating a live deployed environment for developers to test their changes.
00:11
When code is merged into the Dev branch, it triggers a process that deploys the code to create a live environment.
This environment uses automation to spin up various services in AWS, such as serverless lambdas, open search clusters, and Dynamo.
The live environment allows developers to test their code with integrated services and fake data to ensure nothing breaks when deployed to the cloud.
A release is created by merging code from the Dev branch to a higher tier environment, such as test, QA, or staging.
00:13
After testing in the Dev environment, code is merged to a higher tier environment for further testing.
Merging code to a higher environment triggers the creation of a replicated infrastructure, with staging possibly containing more realistic data sets.
Clients, users, or test users can provide feedback by playing with the features in the staging environment.
Load tests and smoke tests may also be performed in the staging environment to ensure the code can handle traffic and real production data.
Using infrastructure as code tools like terraform allows for easy deployment and updating of identical environments for testing and production.
13:28
Infrastructure as code tools help to easily replicate and deploy the same resources in multiple environments.
Developers can avoid manually updating resources in the AWS dashboard, reducing the risk of configuration errors.
Multiple experimental environments can be spun up for testing changes before integration.
In a larger team and project, the deployment process is duplicated for different teams, each with their own unique way of deploying code.
00:14
Teams may have their own set of clients, users, and projects.
Managers oversee and coordinate the deployments of different teams.
In an Enterprise setting, there are integrated prod environments with microservices and different databases.
Handling bugs in a multi-region deployment and ensuring high uptime in Enterprise settings is complex.
00:16
Enterprise projects may require multi-region deployments for resilience.
There are strict requirements for uptime, with some projects needing up to five nines uptime.
Data replication and user privacy laws add complexity to multi-region deployments.
Handling bugs may involve turning off feature flags, rolling back changes, or implementing hotfixes.
In enterprise development, it is important to back merge changes from main to dev or staging environments to keep them up to date.
00:21
Back merging ensures that the dev environment has the latest changes from the main branch.
Enterprise development involves complexity, such as multiple workflows and testing processes, to avoid shipping bugs to production.
High stakes systems like healthcare software require extensive testing and precautions to avoid impacting users' lives.
Using tools like Next.js and Vercel can help avoid some of the complexity in enterprise development, but it's important to add complexity as needed based on explicit requirements and to improve team processes and quality.
00:22
Next.js and Vercel can help streamline the deployment process.
Complexity in enterprise development is not necessarily unnecessary; it serves a purpose in high-stakes projects.
Theo's approach to focusing on fixing bugs quickly after deployment can help avoid some of the complexity.
The level of complexity in a project depends on its risk and impact, with high-risk projects requiring more testing and precautions.
00:23
Projects with basic functionality may not be high-risk and can afford to fix bugs quickly.
Large-scale enterprise systems have a lot of complexity under the hood, which is not always evident in content from startup companies or indie hackers.
💫 FAQs about This YouTube Video

1. What are the key roles in a team of 10 developers working on enterprise software development?

The key roles in a team of 10 developers working on enterprise software development include developers, scrum master, project manager, designer, and client. The client acts as the buffer between the development team and the end users, conveying the vision and requirements for the software.

2. How is the collaboration between the development team and the client described in enterprise software development?

The collaboration between the development team and the client in enterprise software development is essential for understanding and fulfilling the client's needs and vision. It involves regular communication, feedback sessions, and a focus on delivering features that meet the client's requirements.

3. What is the goal of a developer in enterprise software development?

The goal of a developer in enterprise software development is to ship features that meet the needs of the client and users. This involves continuous collaboration, feedback integration, and the delivery of high-quality, polished software.

4. What are the key steps in the process of deploying software in enterprise software development?

The key steps in the process of deploying software in enterprise software development involve version control, feature branching, continuous integration and continuous deployment (CI/CD), and the collaboration between developers to ensure the smooth delivery of features.

5. How is the collaboration and review process managed in a team of 10 developers working on enterprise software development?

The collaboration and review process in a team of 10 developers working on enterprise software development involve regular communication, sharing of knowledge, and thorough code reviews to ensure the quality and integrity of the software. This collaborative approach supports the overall team health and enhances the development process.

6. What are the key benefits of using different branches in the development process?

Using different branches in the development process allows for separate areas of focus, integration of features, and testing before merging into the main branch. It also provides a structured approach to development and helps prevent conflicts between different features being developed simultaneously.

7. How does the deployment process work in the Dev environment?

The deployment process in the Dev environment involves merging code changes into a Dev branch, which triggers the deployment of the code to create a live Dev environment. This allows developers to integrate their features and perform testing in a dedicated environment before further integration.

8. What is the purpose of the staging environment in the software development lifecycle?

The staging environment serves as a pre-production testing environment where the software is tested in a setup that mirrors the production environment. It allows for final testing, including load tests and user acceptance testing, before the release of the software.

9. How does infrastructure as code contribute to the efficiency of the deployment process?

Infrastructure as code (IaC) allows for the automated provisioning and management of infrastructure. By using IaC tools, the deployment process becomes more efficient and less error-prone. It also enables the creation of consistent environments for development, testing, and production.

10. What are the main benefits of using different environments in the development process?

Using different environments, such as Dev, staging, and production, provides a controlled and structured approach to software development. It allows for thorough testing, validation of changes, and ensures the stability and quality of the software before it is released to users.

11. What are the challenges of scaling the software development process in a larger team and a larger project?

Scaling the software development process in a larger team and a larger project presents challenges such as each team having their own set of clients, users, and unique ways of deploying code. In an Enterprise setting, higher up managers coordinate the deployment process for different teams, leading to a more complex and challenging environment with integrated production environments and the need for efficient coordination.

12. How is the deployment process managed in an Enterprise setting with multiple teams and projects?

In an Enterprise setting with multiple teams and projects, the deployment process is managed by higher up managers who oversee and coordinate the different teams' deployment methods. Each team may have its own unique way of deploying code, adding to the complexity of the overall deployment process.

13. What are the complexities involved in ensuring high uptime and resilience in a multi-region deployment?

Ensuring high uptime and resilience in a multi-region deployment involves setting up infrastructure in different regions, such as East Coast and West Coast in AWS, and replicating data between the regions. It also requires addressing the challenges of redirecting users in the event of a region failure and complying with data replication laws.

14. How are bugs handled in the software deployment process, especially when a feature causes errors after deployment?

Bugs in the software deployment process, particularly when a feature causes errors after deployment, are handled by turning off the feature using feature flags, performing a rollback deployment, or implementing a hotfix. Teams may need to work directly off the main branch to quickly deploy a fix, adding to the complexity of bug handling in the deployment process.

15. What is the importance of backing merging changes from Main to Dev environment in enterprise development?

Backing merging changes from Main to Dev environment is important in enterprise development to ensure that the Dev environment is up to date with the latest changes and to avoid complications in the development process.

16. How does enterprise development differ from working directly off of Main for smaller teams and startups?

Enterprise development involves more complexity, such as backing merging changes and implementing multi-tiered environments, to avoid breaking production and ensure quality. Smaller teams and startups may work directly off of Main and focus on quick deployment without the need for extensive complexity.

17. What are the challenges of working on high-stakes systems in enterprise development?

Working on high-stakes systems in enterprise development brings challenges such as the need to avoid breaking production, the implementation of extensive testing, and the use of multi-tiered environments to ensure the stability and reliability of the system.

18. What is the importance of understanding large-scale enterprise systems for developers?

Understanding large-scale enterprise systems is important for developers to gain insight into the complexities and inner workings of enterprise development, which can differ significantly from the processes used in smaller teams and startups.

19. How can the use of tools like Nexjs and Vercel help simplify the complexity of enterprise development?

The use of tools like Nexjs and Vercel can help simplify the complexity of enterprise development by allowing developers to focus on quick deployment and gradually add complexity as needed, while still ensuring the stability and reliability of the system.