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Augmented Humanity 015: Art, Activism and Archives at IAIA

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💫 Short Summary

Ryan Flahive discusses his work as an archivist at the Institute of American Indian Arts, the digitization of the archive, and the effort to make the archives more accessible. He also talks about the 'Seeing Red' radio archives, a collection of original recordings documenting the American Indian Movement in the 1970s, and their importance in understanding Native American history.Ryan Flahive, an archivist at the Institute of American Indian Arts, discusses the challenges and solutions in archiving, including copyright management, digitization, and ensuring the integrity of digital objects. He also talks about the decision-making process for IAIA's digital archives and the importance of making archives accessible.Ryan Flahive discusses the digital initiatives at the IAIA Library and Archives, highlighting the shift towards digital collections, the importance of preserving data through redundancy, the lack of training for people of color in the field, and the role of archives, libraries, and museums as community centers. Additionally, he mentions the organization's collaboration with ATOM to increase capacity in preservation and digitization for tribal institutions.

✨ Highlights
📊 Transcript
An archive of Native American artifacts at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) includes not just traditional items, but also performance art, film installations, and radio shows.
00:00
The archive is currently being digitized and made publicly accessible.
Guest Ryan Flahive is an archivist at IAIA and teaches at the museum studies department.
An archivist's role is to organize and make records available, which can be digital, paper, or other formats.
The push towards digitization is driven by the cost of storage and the need for access, not just preservation.
There has been a surge in demand for archives due to the inability of scholars to wait for physical access, and a growing demand for remote museum experiences.
04:57
Archives are not physically accessible if not catalogued or indexed.
The archive includes a varied collection of materials, from papers to photographs to audio tapes.
The focus of the archive is on art and artists, as well as cultural heritage and memory for Native people.
The process of digitizing archives is ongoing and strives to make the content free and accessible.
The guest discusses the 'Seeing Red' radio archives, a collection of original recordings by Suzanne Harjo and her husband, documenting the American Indian Movement in the 1970s.
10:19
The archive was in danger due to 'sticky shed syndrome' but was salvaged through a grant program.
The guest aims to create teachers' and curriculum guides from the transcribed archives.
The radio archives were discovered in a disorganized state, scattered in different boxes.
The 'Seeing Red' radio archives provide a valuable historical narrative about the American Indian Movement.
Ryan Flahive discusses the challenges and permissions involved in archiving and digitizing copyrighted music.
00:00
Archiving and digitizing copyrighted music involves complex copyright permissions.
Each artist and organization has their own copyright, making the process tricky.
The user is ultimately responsible for clearing copyright permissions.
Fair use archiving is done for educational purposes, but commercial use requires more scrutiny and permissions.
The archival material from the 'Seeing Red' radio show is available online through different resources.
03:35
The material is available on the archives website and can be accessed through a research guide.
It is also hosted by New Mexico's digital collections and the complete collection finding aid is available on the Rocky Mountain Online Archive.
A total of 58 recordings of the 'Seeing Red' radio show are accessible through these online resources.
The use of archives in the classroom and the focus on decolonization in the work of the archivist.
07:21
Initially, students were not aware of the archives or how to use them.
Efforts were made to integrate archives into the curriculum and teach students how to conduct archival research.
The focus is on decolonizing the archives and empowering tribes to maintain their own archives.
The maintenance and preservation of records are important for sustaining a historical narrative.
The speaker's journey into archiving and the importance of research perspective for students.
11:29
The speaker learned about archives through research and being assigned research projects.
The speaker emphasizes the value of a research perspective for students, especially fine artists looking for historical references.
Empowering tribes to maintain their own archives is a crucial and empowering task.
The maintenance and preservation of records are important for sustaining a historical narrative.
The challenges and solutions in the digitization and archiving process.
15:25
Obsolete equipment and technology pose a challenge to digitization.
Ensuring the integrity of digital objects through checksums.
The need for continuous maintenance and updates in the digitization process.
The decision to use the IAIA's digital archives as a learning tool for students.
The importance of overcoming the challenges in archiving and digitization to preserve cultural heritage.
19:22
Archives play a crucial role in preserving cultural heritage.
Challenges such as obsolete equipment and technology need to be overcome.
The integrity of digital objects and the need for maintenance are vital in the preservation process.
IAIA's digital archives are used as a learning tool for students to understand the cultural significance of archived materials.
The speaker's role in the decision-making process for archives and the importance of making archives accessible.
23:22
The speaker is involved in the decision-making process for archives at IAIA.
Making archives accessible to the public and ensuring they are used and not just stored.
The archives are a combination of personal and institutional records.
The archives reflect the individualized expression emphasized by the school.
The decision to use the New Mexico Digital Collections and the Rocky Mountain Online Archive for IAIA's digital archives.
27:22
The decision was influenced by the lack of structure for delivering digital images on the IAIA website.
The speaker believes in consortiums and chose the New Mexico Digital Collections and RMOA for their no-cost option and support.
Efforts are being made to integrate the archives into grants and build a relationship for other institutions to digitize and have a place to put their archives.
The industry standard for digital access management is the contentDM software owned and managed by OCLC, but IAIA is moving towards a new system called Proficio Elements for art and archives.
The speaker discusses the importance of being able to serve patrons by making digital content easily accessible.
00:00
The focus is on serving patrons by making digital content easily accessible.
The speaker mentions that all the data is hosted on a server in Albuquerque.
She describes the process of digitizing and uploading images using a web portal.
The speaker talks about the upcoming switch to a new database and the challenges involved.
They mention the decision to bring the digital collections back in-house.
The guest talks about the importance of having multiple backups and off-site storage for preserving digital data.
04:27
It is a best practice to have a minimum of three backups, including one off-site.
The guest personally backs up data on a hard drive every month and takes it home for off-site storage.
The guest works with the executive committee of ATOM (Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums).
ATOM is focused on increasing capacity in preservation and digitization for tribal schools, libraries, archives, and museums.
The guest discusses the lack of training for people of color in the field of archives, libraries, and museums, and the efforts to diversify and provide more educational opportunities.
08:32
The guest mentions working with the Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums (ATOM) to address the lack of training and opportunities for people of color.
There is a need to change and diversify the field of archives, libraries, and museums.
The guest emphasizes the importance of the museum studies department in pushing for diversity and working with ATOM.
More native art curators are needed, and there is a movement towards having more native people in museums.
The speaker highlights the role of archives, libraries, and museums as community centers for cultural memory and informal teaching.
12:34
Contrasts the AAM (American Alliance of Museums) meetings with ATOM meetings in terms of relatability and problem solving.
ATOM focuses on fundamental skill development and ensuring people have the skills to get the job done.
Discusses the importance of having a diverse workforce in archives, libraries, and museums.
Mentions the movement towards having more native art curators who are native people themselves.
The guest emphasizes the importance of digital technology in preserving and providing access to cultural heritage.
16:38
Digital technology is crucial for preserving and providing access to cultural heritage.
Collaboration and networking are important in the field of archives and libraries.
There is a need for more people with digital skills in the cultural heritage sector.
The guest speaks about the changing nature of the field and the challenges and opportunities it presents.
💫 FAQs about This YouTube Video

1. What is the New Mexico Institute of American Indian Arts archive?

The archive includes a wide range of Native American artifacts, such as performance art, film installations, and radio shows, and is currently being digitized for public access. Ryan Flahive, the archivist at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA), discusses his role and the effort to make the archives more accessible.

2. How does the digitization of archives affect access and preservation?

Digitization allows for better access to archives, especially for remote visitors, but also requires careful preservation strategies to ensure the original material's integrity. The focus is on making the archives more accessible without compromising their preservation.

3. What are the challenges and benefits of on-demand digitization in archives?

On-demand digitization in archives allows for flexibility in meeting specific requests but also poses challenges in managing the process and ensuring the quality and authenticity of the digitized materials. The approach aims to balance the benefits of digitization with the challenges of maintaining the integrity of the archives.

4. How are copyrights managed in the digital age, especially for archived and digitized materials?

In the digital age, managing copyrights for archived and digitized materials is a complex process. Each artist and organization has their own copyright, making the process tricky. The user is ultimately responsible for clearing copyright permissions, and commercial use requires more scrutiny and permissions. The maintenance and preservation of records are important for sustaining a historical narrative.

5. What are the challenges and solutions in archiving and digitization, particularly when dealing with obsolete equipment and technology?

The challenges in archiving and digitization include dealing with obsolete equipment and technology. Ensuring the integrity of digital objects through checksums is a key solution. The archives play a crucial role in preserving cultural heritage, and efforts are made to overcome challenges to ensure the accessibility and use of the archives.

6. How does the IAIA's digital archives decision feed into the historical records commission, and how are the stories told through these archives different from tribal or historical museum archives?

The decision to use the IAIA's digital archives is influenced by the need to have a place to put archives and integrate them into grants. The IAIA's archives focus on art and the history of the contemporary native art movement, providing a different perspective from tribal or historical museum archives. The individualized expression emphasized by the IAIA's archives is important, and efforts are made to ensure the accessibility and use of the archives.

7. How are the digital collections at the IAIA Library and Archives made accessible?

The digital collections at the IAIA Library and Archives are made accessible by ensuring that the data can be found as easily as possible, with the server space provided by UNM. The speaker mentions the process of digitization, metadata creation, and batch uploading of images to match with a spreadsheet.

8. What is the plan for the legacy database at the IAIA Library and Archives once the new Rediscovery database is up and running?

Once the new Rediscovery database is up and running, the legacy database at the IAIA Library and Archives will become obsolete. The focus is on not adding to the New Mexico's digital collections using the legacy database, as the new Rediscovery database is expected to offer better functionality.

9. Why is the IAIA Library and Archives bringing back the digital collections in-house?

The IAIA Library and Archives is bringing back the digital collections in-house by using the Rediscovery software and hosting the website with the data. This decision is made to avoid the clunkiness of the previous option, Content DM, and to have more control and better management of the digital collections.

10. What does the guest emphasize as the only way to preserve data in archives and libraries?

The guest emphasizes that the only way to preserve data in archives and libraries is through redundancy, suggesting a minimum of three backups, including one off-site, as a best practice.

11. How does the guest emphasize the importance of diversity in the field of archives, libraries, and museums?

The guest emphasizes the importance of diversity in the field of archives, libraries, and museums, particularly the need for more native art curators who are native people themselves. The guest mentions the movement towards diversification and the need for more educational opportunities for people of color.