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Virtual Visits | Art & the Order of Nature in Indigenous Philippine Textiles

Ayala Museum2020-10-26
13K views|3 years ago
💫 Short Summary

The exhibition showcases indigenous textiles, highlighting traditional arts' local and universal principles. Textiles symbolize beauty and belief systems, with weaving representing man's role as a mediator. Geometric shapes like circles and squares hold symbolic significance, representing unity and creation patterns. The exhibition features textiles donated by Mercedes Zobel, exploring design inspiration and social structures of indigenous people. The hexagon symbolizes the six periods of Creation in various religions and is prevalent in Philippine textile arts. The collaboration with the Prince's School of Traditional Arts emphasizes universal design principles' interconnectivity in the Philippines.

✨ Highlights
📊 Transcript
Textile exhibition showcasing indigenous communities' traditional arts and principles.
01:41
Textiles represent beauty, worldviews, and belief systems, with weaving symbolizing man's connection between heaven and earth.
Geometric shapes like circles, squares, and octagons hold symbolic meanings across cultures, representing unity, earth, and creation patterns.
Exhibition includes textiles donated by Mercedes Zobel, exploring design inspiration and social structures of indigenous groups.
Visitors can engage with life-sized dress-up dolls to gain a deeper understanding of textile ensembles.
The significance of hexagons in natural forms and religious symbolism.
07:38
Biomorphic design principles combining curvilinear and geometric forms for harmony in traditional arts.
Ukil in Sulu and okir in Maranao are prevalent in Philippine textile arts, wood carving, brass ware, painting, and textiles.
Collaboration with the Prince's School of Traditional Arts showcases universal design principles connecting people and communities in the Philippines.